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Mental Health Week Special: The Stepping Stones To Becoming A More Mindful SME

Mental Health Week Special: The Stepping Stones To Becoming A More Mindful SME

Now in it’s 19th year, Mental Health Awareness Week always begins on the second Monday in May. In 2019, it takes place between 13th and 19th May.

In a world that is increasingly opening up to – and understanding those with – mental health issues, it’s no surprise that Mental Health Awareness Week is attracting more and more attention in both the media and business worlds year on year.

Whilst I am a great supporter of anything that raises people’s awareness to mental health issues in the workplace, it takes more than just one week in the year to adequately support your employees’ mental health.

Right now, 1 in 6 workers is dealing with a mental health problem such as anxiety, depression or stress. Clearly, this can stop people from performing at their best.

Organisations perform better when their staff are healthy, motivated and focused. Smart businesses support employees who are experiencing mental health problems to cope and recover. The support people receive from employers is key in determining how well and how quickly they are able to get back to peak performance.

Here are 10 simple steps SMEs can take to make a real difference to their teams’ mental health, all year round:

1. Create a culture that supports staff to be open about their mental health: Send a clear signal to staff that their mental health matters and that being open about it will lead to support, not discrimination. Work with your employees and managers to break down the stigma related to mental health.

2. Ensure your sickness absence and return to work policies apply to mental as well as physical health problems: Policies should make it clear that people must be treated equally whatever their health problem. Make sure this is communicated effectively so everyone in the business is aware.

3. Train managers in how to support their team through mental health problems: You can’t just ‘expect’ them to feel comfortable dealing with issues that have previously been considered taboo. Giving them the tools, confidence and support to engage in the right conversations is key to supporting employees properly.

4. Open up the discourse on mental health: It’s vital managers routinely ask staff how they’re doing and reference their mental health – it helps build up people’s confidence to speak up earlier on and get the help they need sooner.

5. Fully support anyone who discloses a mental health problem: Once you’ve opened up the dialogue on mental health with someone, the priority is to develop positive steps to address the key issues they’re struggling with. Generally, these steps are small and involve simple adjustments to someone’s job role or extra support from their manager. Often the necessary change is one of attitude, expectations or communication – rather than a major change or significant cost.

6. Develop proactive action plans that work for both the individual and the business: Support managers to work together with their team members to develop a personal action plan to proactively manage their mental health. This allows people to plan in advance and develop tailored support for a time when they’re not coping so well. It also facilitates open dialogue with managers – leading to practical, agreed steps which can form the basis for regular monitoring and review.

7. Be flexible and open minded to simple changes: When people feel under pressure they can find it hard to prioritise their workload. Flexible working hours and increased one-to-one supervision can help people better manage their time and plan and prioritise. Some find a regular surgery-style trouble-shooting session with their manager helpful, where managers can go through the person’s to-do-list with them to coach them on how to approach challenging tasks. Often this acts as a useful pressure valve to help people regain confidence and cope with challenges.

8. Manage an employee’s time off sick effectively: Sometimes an employee may be so unwell they need time off work to recover. The way organisations manage a period of sickness absence is key in shaping how well and how quickly people are able to return to work and get back to peak performance.

9. Prepare for an employee’s return to work: When people are ready to return to work managers should arrange to meet up in a neutral comfortable venue to catch up and discuss the details of their return together. An effective return-to-work interview is vital to build trust and engagement with the employee and support their smooth and sustainable return to work.

  • take a person centred approach and be sensitive to the individual’s needs
  • be proactive and get involved as early as possible if someone is unwell
  • be positive, professional and supportive throughout the process
  • maintain contact with people throughout their sickness absence.

10. Engage with a provider who can support you through the challenges: It’s always reassuring to know that you don’t need to have all the answers yourself.  HR consultants (such as TheHRHub) have a wealth of experience in supporting managers and employees through all kinds of mental health challenges.  It’s worth having someone on your side for support, should you need it.

For help and advice on any HR issue, get in touch for a no strings discussion about your business needs and how we can help. Drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk or give us a call on 0203 627 7048.

Image: Canva


How to Inspire Loyalty Like a Bodyguard

How to Inspire Loyalty Like a Bodyguard

You may have noticed that over the past few weeks, the nation has been gripped by ‘Bodyguard’ fever: the television series most watched on the BBC all year, which has been the topic of numerous ‘water cooler’ conversations at work. Centred around the ongoing threat and execution of terrorist events and the impact of these on the Government, Security Services, Police and Armed forces, at the core of this drama is the concept of ‘loyalty’: who has it and to whom are they faithful?

So far, no different to a myriad of other dramas attempting to draw viewers. Here however the storyline is brilliantly balanced (and just a little bit too close to real life events we’ve seen to be dismissed as never-gonna-happen-here…), the acting even better and the ending…..well, far be it for me to unlock any spoilers for those who haven’t quite caught up on iPlayer, but suffice it to say it strikes again the right proportion of the believable and the shocking. And that’s because across all the goodies and baddies we meet in the series, across all the multiple plot lines, flaws and strengths are presented to us which are uniquely human and recognisable, with many coming from the type of loyalties which we see in ourselves in everyday life.

Of course, before we take the analogies too far, most of us after all aren’t likely to ever need or want to ‘take a bullet’ for our leader (it would bring a whole new meaning to ‘taking one for the team’…) however people take all sorts of action and inaction in the name of loyalty: they defend, attack and work hard for those they are loyal to. If your team are loyal to you, they’re going to care if you win the deal or not and put in the hours to help you secure it. If your team are loyal to you, they’ll travel to the ends of the earth for you (or even to that meeting in Bognor Regis someone’s slipped in their diary for 4pm on a Friday night…). And if your team are loyal to you, they’ll think twice about replying to that message received from a recruiter who’s been stalking them on LinkedIn…..

There are many ways to inspire and earn the type of loyalty which will transform your business but we’ve cherry picked our favourites below to give you a headstart:

  • Include others in the conversation. Listen to what your team are saying ( and also to what they’re not saying) as a healthy team is one where constructive dialogue and challenge is welcomed. So if your team is tight lipped or never offers anything more than a murmured ‘whatever you say boss’ to everything you suggest or ask, then now might be time to do a bit more listening than telling. Not sure how to do this?
  • Be a little bit vulnerable yourself: you certainly don’t need to take the lead from Hawe’s character in Episode 3 and have a ‘pre-conference’ moment yourself with a member of your team (in fact please don’t unless you want someone to take the lead in bringing some sort of harassment allegation against you) however disclosing information about yourself, including how you feel and what challenges you also may be up against, helps others to feel that they themselves can open up themselves a bit more too. It helps build trust and cement good relationships.
  • Stand back. People will not show you their best selves if you are looking over their shoulder constantly or lurking in that Google doc you’ve shared with them watching every keystroke and willing it to populate (yes, they can see you doing this – that’s why they’re called ‘live’ documents!). They will instead show you signs of anxiety and (probably) frustration. But never the flourish you are looking for. Period.
  • Treat people with respect: this includes not hiding bad news when it surfaces and not avoiding difficult conversations. Many years after I left one particular company I would have gone out of my way to recommend them as a brilliant place to work, despite the fact that my exit came shortly after writing my own redundancy letter*. The reason? Despite the P45, throughout my time with them, they had always been upfront with the bad news and treated me like an adult. And you’d be surprised at how uncommon that is….

But the biggest way to inspire loyalty?  I’ll give you a hint: it’s not the people working for you who should be taking on the role of Bodyguard. As their leader, it is you who should have their back. The one who should support and look out for them. Any team who doesn’t feel they have the support of their leader is not one which will feel loyalty. And in turn, all honesty, performance and discretionary effort flies out of the window along with all those ideas which may just help you become the next Apple, Google or Amazon….

For help in inspiring your own brand of employee loyalty in your team, drop us a line via hello@thehrhub.co.uk or 0203 627 7048.

Image: Photo by Paulius Dragunas on Unsplash

*It’s very common in HR-land to do this I promise. I mean, who else are you going to ask?

The Bad HR Habits Of Good Bosses – How Many Are YOU Guilty Of?

The Bad HR Habits Of Good Bosses – How Many Are YOU Guilty Of?

Even the most well-meaning of leaders can fall into habitual behaviours that can have a negative impact on their people. It’s the same as eating or drinking too much,  it’s only when things spiral out of control that you realise you’ve got a problem.

Here are some of the bad HR habits we’ve witnessed over the years. And the good news is they’re easy to fix….

Carrying Out Annual Reviews On An Annual Basis

Hang on a sec – why exactly is this a bad habit?? Shouldn’t you be making sure that performance discussions do take place?? Of course you should. But if they’re only happening once a year, then you’re missing a trick. Managing and improving performance needs to be built into your everyday working practices. If it’s not, then you can’t realistically expect to improve productivity.

Getting Stuck In The Filing Cabinet

You don’t need us to tell you that the world of business is moving faster than ever before. You’re probably using online tactics when it comes to your sales and marketing, for example, but what about HR? It could be time to ditch the notion that HR lives in the filing cabinet, and bring your business up to speed. Online systems with good security are as secure as any filing cabinets and will often save you time and hassle with your HR Admin.

Thinking That Training And Learning Are One And The Same

There’s no denying that training can be expensive. Send a few employees to a conference, book in some places on an external course, or bring in a professional trainer for a couple of days, and your bill will be hefty. Sometimes, formal training is essential and/or advisable: when you’re rolling out new software, when your team require a recognised qualification etc. But what’s arguably much more important is ongoing learning within the workplace. Nurturing your talent isn’t a one-off event – it’s about what happens in your business on a day-to-day basis. So get to it with those lunch and learn sessions, involve all the team in what they can all learn from each other and challenge your team to show what they’ve learnt on an on-going basis.

Hogging All The Decision Making

As the boss you may be thinking: but that’s what I’m here for! Obviously there are some key decisions that only you and your top team should be making, but imagine how much time you would free up in your life if others around you came up with a range of solutions to the things which had been stopping you from sleeping for most of the previous night, gave you ideas for your next product or sorted out problems they had about the office move between themselves…. Allowing and encouraging your team to make decisions (or at least contribute to them by involving them) inspires trust and confidence which can pay you back massive returns in terms of loyalty and engagement, not to mention the innovation which can come from a varied viewpoint.

Being self-aware enough to recognise and correct your own bad habits is a hugely positive example to show your team. Even more so if you’ve had the courage to ask for their opinions first.

For help or advice on any HR issue get in touch today at hello@thehrhub.co.uk.co.uk or call 0203 627 7048 to speak to our team direct. We’re offering a free initial review to help you understand how to make the valuable changes to best support your business.

Image: Canva

 

HR Surgery: What Should I Be Doing As a Startup Every Month For HR?

HR Surgery: What Should I Be Doing As a Startup Every Month For HR?

Time flies when you’re running your own business. One minute it’s January and you’re hiring your first few team members, telling yourself you’ll align their progress with the rest of the business, and then the next, you find it’s Summer already and all your good intentions have never not quite translated into any sort of strategy ….

Very Few Startups & SMEs Allocate Time Once A Month To Focus On HR

And whilst it’s likely that you’ve kept a regular eye on your sales and finance tasks in a structured way every month, when it comes to your people, chances are that any structure has been left to happen ‘naturally’. If you’re close to the team, check in regularly as a matter of course and have spent time building relationships with them from the word ‘go’, then this is all good news as you’ve built some really strong foundations already despite no mention of the words ‘HR’. However if you’ve left all checkups and communications aside as you have your head down, there not only may there be a risk that the next “have you got a quick minute?” directed your way, might just be a complaint or – worse still – the dreaded resignation letter, you will also be missing a trick in planning and investing in your biggest asset: your team.

Our Monthly HR Checklist For Startups & SMEs

To help you structure what can sometimes seem a daunting task, we’ve created a monthly HR checklist for you, designed to make sure you keep your business and your people on track. Nothing heavy. And nothing daunting. But a few things that – if you review on a regular monthly basis – will significantly help boost your team’s productivity and your overall leadership, saving you oodles of time and hassle in the long run.

1. Step back and do a quick people overview (as you would your sales or finances): What are its strengths and weaknesses? What does your team look like this year in size, shape, roles and productivity? More importantly, what do you want them to be doing differently in the next 6 – 12 months to meet your own overall goals?

2. With 1) in mind… how you want to develop the team and what are the 1, 2 and 3 priorities you will be looking at for the coming 6 months with them?

3. Set up some simple KPIs to track in relation to your team. Basics ordinarily will include things such as headcount, salary bill, absence rates etc (which track directly to your finances), right through to those which might tell you a little bit more in the long run & will take a bit of time to start yielding the insight you’re after. In this latter category, you need to put your thinking cap on about what you want to measure (employee satisfaction, time you spend with each employee, number of new ideas/ initiatives generated by the team etc) and why it’s important.

4. Clarify to the team what the company goals are and what progress is being made towards them. Too busy for an All Hands/ Town Hall/ Company Meeting? Whilst face to face is often best in this regard, we find that the ‘little and often’ approach works best to get the message across and make people feel involved, so just make sure that there is some communication on this each month, even if via Email/ slack/ video etc

5. Get feedback from the team on how they are finding each project/ progress against the goals. Whilst there are now many different software programmes which can help do this for you in a regular and structured way, at the very least, add on a question to all at the bottom of any team wide communications that make clear that you want to hear from people or walk around the office and ask people face to face.

6. Put together a simple action plan to address any queries which arise. And forecast for the team over how their roles might change, what their risk profile is and how you can support and motivate them

7. Make the team see you as human: take them out to lunch to chat away from the office and stay connected. One former CEO I worked with liked to take afternoon tea with his team & another took each person out for lunch in their first week to find out more about them, both delightful traditions appreciated by all.

8. Review the behaviours of your current team. Look at what the qualities of the team are displaying are and what channel they joined you via. When it comes to recruiting, referrals can be a really good channel & work wonders on those KPIs. Share recognition about great performance: your team will love you for it (even if they’re a bit embarrassed initially…)

9. Take stock of what learning may be needed for individuals/ teams to support your goals. This doesn’t need to be expensive (we have heaps of ideas in a previous blog ‘Learning on a Shoestring’) but as a no.1 area for motivation as well as often being needed to adapt to a changing business, getting a clear idea on where people can develop is key.

10. Talk to the team and bounce ideas off people who don’t have a direct interest in your business to get some objective advice and open your mind to trying out new ways of doing things. But whether you’re are start up with just a couple of employees or hitting the big time and your headcount is getting into triple figures, it’s never the wrong time to focus on getting the most from your team and providing a great environment for them to thrive.

If you’re struggling however with getting the full benefits from your team and finding the time to develop your ideas, help from a switched-on HR professional could be what you need.

For help in getting (and keeping!) your business on track with it’s team please email hello@thehrhub.co.uk.co.uk or call 0203 627 7048  and speak to our team. We’re always happy to help and offer a free initial review to help you understand how to make valuable changes to support your business.

TheHRhub: helping restless business owners create and manage good working relationships with their staff in a direct and pragmatic way. #employeemagic

 

HR Futures: Engagement With A Fractional Workforce

HR Futures: Engagement With A Fractional Workforce

Fractional: [adjective] Relating to only a part of something; Extremely small or insignificant

The fractional workforce is a phrase new to many. But not for long I suspect.  A term used to loosely describe those who provide work to one or more businesses, it includes many of the 5 million people in the UK who are classified as ‘self-employed’ –   the contractors, the freelancers, the ‘gig’ workers, the temporary staff you have on your books – not to mention those who might be on your payroll on a part time basis. The common denominator of all of these being that they are just not solely dedicated to your business.

But far from these being just the ‘giggers’ who have grabbed the headlines in recent months – those who deliver your food, clean your house or ferry you home at the end of an evening – 60% of these fractional workers are found to be in highly skilled or managerial professions (ONS), and most of whom have turned to fractional work out of choice.

Over half our SME client base are increasing their use these types of workers to supplement their own teams on a regular basis – as accountants, marketeers, designers, data analysts, developers…even HR folks – but a handful have gone one step further by having them as core members of their senior or leadership teams. And anecdotally I know of plenty more highly innovative businesses who use diverse and fractional teams gathered from their wider networks to deliver high profile projects, because they just don’t have the skills they need in their existing employee pool.

But given that many of these highly skilled people turn to fractional work because it supports the things which motivate them most: freedom (in location, work patterns, scope) and ownership of what they do, how do you as a business owner make sure that these broader team members are as ‘engaged’ and ‘onboard’ as your permanent staff members, whilst balancing the risk (and fear associated) that you may lose control over some of the work? From extensive experience on both sides of the fence, here are our pointers on some things you can practically do to rapidly assemble a crack team and get the most out of your working relationships with this group:

  1. Get the basics right, but recognise that a contract simply cannot cover ‘every eventuality’: It goes without saying that a properly worded contract is a no-brainer to manage your legal risks, however our experience is that a properly worded contract is not one which attempts to try and control every single thought and word a person emits during their time working with you (having had many run-ins from those not willing to sign away their entire thought catalogue in a crudely worded IP clause, this is a route which does not bear well with many!). One which seeks to do this beyond what is necessary for the delivery of the work will no doubt hold up the process for any onboarding as wordsmithing goes back and forth, giving your competitors a chance to steal a march on you!
  2. People are people, regardless of ‘working status’ & so speak to them as such: The Contractor’ is not an appropriately named designation for most to respond to and is something which should be reserved only for an introduction by  Hollywood-voiceover-man to something infinitely more fictional….
  3. Treat your wider teams as a community: communities support each other and work for the greater good; they embrace differences, thrive when there is co-operation and provide a vast array of talent for you to pull from which you might otherwise not get access to. Communities do not take the pi** with each other, as they know that they may be the one asking for a favour the following week….
  4. Communicate in a way which is fluid & which builds trust: ask yourself whether you really need different email lists for ‘employees’ and ‘contractors’? Many businesses also exclude non-permanent staff from their communications platforms, however this serves to alienate at best and cause productivity issues at worst. Remember (see point 1) they’ve already signed the same sort of confidentiality clauses as anyone else in the business…
  5. Don’t ignore wider development needs: from onboarding and beyond, make sure you are inclusive and relevant in providing development opportunities. This doesn’t mean sponsoring someone on the MBA if they are only with you for 2 weeks, but may include including them in your onboarding programme, lunch and learns etc
  6. Reward is still important (but outside of traditional methods look to recognition and referral as currency to use): You may think that paying the monthly invoice is reward for these team members done and dusted, however (even if you haven’t read oodles of posts about this one – really??) ‘reward’ to most people is more than just a wedge of cash…. Angela Mortimer, a successful recruitment firm specialising in PA and support staff hold an annual event to celebrate and recognise their temporary staff who don’t get to always get to join in on the social side from the organisations they provide service to or be included in their reward practices. A nice touch I think, which in addition plays to point 3 (above).

This post doesn’t (purposefully) address some of the legal ramifications for employing different types of workers that make up this section of the workforce – that’s definitely for another day and is dependant on ever evolving legal challenges being made – however fractional work is on the increase & those who can strategically think of their workforce as beyond those on their payroll, will already be one step ahead.

For more details on integrating your workforce or any other HR challenges you might have, drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk or call 0203 627 7048.

Image Credit: unsplash

 

New Toolkit Encourages Businesses To Promote Healthy Eating And Exercise To Employees

New Toolkit Encourages Businesses To Promote Healthy Eating And Exercise To Employees

Public Health England and Business in the Community have published a toolkit in an effort to encourage employers to promote healthier eating and exercising to their employees. Keen to stress the business benefits, the toolkit explains that such initiatives can boost productivity, slash absence rates, and play a key role in facilitating a happy workforce.

And while this might fall into the yet-another-thing-I’ve-got-to-do category (quite far down for many if I’m honest) of what to look at whilst running a business, what is becoming increasingly clear is that the health of the nation is a ticking time bomb. According to the NHS, the number of people being diagnosed with diabetes has more than doubled in the past 20 years, and rising obesity levels continue to grab headlines. As an employer, you have the ability to make a positive impact in your staff’s lives, as well as strengthen your business for the future, so it might be worth having a gander…..

Occupational health isn’t just about ensuring your staff have comfortable chairs to sit on (although yes, that is one of thing basics…) as the real benefits will be gained by those who are more proactive with their responsibilities as employers, tapping into the opportunities that exist for all of us to have a much more holistic impact on our team’s lives.

The toolkit includes:

  • Suggestions that healthier food and drink options should be available within the workplace, including at meetings and events
  • Ideas around organising ‘family days’, so staff can get their loved ones onboard with healthier habits
  • Advice for managing shift workers and remote workers: two groups of staff that will experience unique difficulties when it comes to maintaining their health and wellbeing
  • Guidance for handling sensitive mental health issues in the workplace

Though the suggestions are comprehensive and provide a lot of food for thought for employers, it’s also stressed that there’s rarely a one-size-fits-all approach. Businesses are encouraged to involve their staff in any initiatives from the very earliest stages, giving them a voice and the opportunity to hone a way forward that’s really going to work for them. After all, if your staff aren’t engaged and onboard, then your efforts are going to fall on deaf ears and fail to meet their objectives.

We recognise that employers have a lot on their plates. You may well think that you simply don’t have the time to consider promoting better levels of health and wellbeing to your staff. You’ve got performance reviews to handle, back to work meetings to schedule, and a whole load of paperwork that seems to mount up on your desk on an hourly basis. 

But there are benefits to be had by adopting some of the suggestions here ( others we’ve seen and shared previously), so if you can find the time, you should definitely give some careful consideration to how you can ‘borrow’ a couple of the ideas in order to boost the long-term prospects of your business.

Not got the time but like the idea? Drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk for a quick chat on how we might be able to help or call 0203 627 7048.

Image: Unsplash