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Legal Eagles: Up and Coming Employment Law Changes

Legal Eagles: Up and Coming Employment Law Changes

It’s that time of year again folks…. This April new employment legislation comes into effect.

Here’s a quick summary of the new legislative changes coming into place this Spring:

  • Extensions of IR35 to the Private sector: this one is key if you employ a number of people through PSC (Personal Services Companies – also known as ‘umbrella’ organisations) as IR35 rules prevent contractors who are performing similar roles to employees, and working through PSC, from paying less tax and NICs than if they were permanently employed by these companies. From 6 April 2021, deciding whether IR35 applies becomes the responsibility of all private sector employers that in a tax year have: more than 50 employee; an annual turnover over £10.2 million; a balance sheet worth over £5.1 million.
  • Wage rises: Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced on November 2020 that from April 2021, the National Living Wage would rise to £8.91 an hour (an increase of 2.2%) and be extended to 23 and 24 year olds for the first time (previously the NLW applied only to 25 year olds and older). All other NMW rates will increase at the same time in line with Low Pay Commission recommendations.. Other rates also increase.
  • Statutory pay rises for maternity, paternity and other parental leave payments: to £151.70 per week
  • Gender Pay Gap reporting: Private and voluntary sector employers in England, Wales and Scotland with at least 250 employees are required to publish information about the differences in pay and bonuses between men and women in their workforce, based on a ‘snapshot’ date of 5 April each year. Due to COVID, 2019/20 reports are suspended however companies now have to September 2021 to report 20/21.

For further help and advice on how legislation might affect your business, drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk or give us a call on 0203 6277048.

Image: Photo by Flickr – Maia Weinstock. LEGO legal justice team.

It Takes All Sorts – Encouraging Diversity & Inclusivity in your Team

It Takes All Sorts – Encouraging Diversity & Inclusivity in your Team

Stepping out of the North Sea on New Year’s Day after my short ‘dip’, I was grappling with changing back out of my wetsuit into dry clothes under an enormous (yet not quite big enough…) towel, when my family were greeted by some passers by on the beach shaking their heads and muttering “It takes all sorts” to each other. We smiled and nodded at them through chattering teeth with what I hoped conveyed a sense of more cheery New Year’s Day vigour than I felt at that particular moment (given both the temperature around us and the fact that due to misjudging the car parking vs beach entry point we were in for a ‘bit of a walk’ back to anything which resembled heating). And ignored the slight judginess that came with the phrase they’d just shared.

True, it might be slightly at odds to submerge yourself in near freezing water when you could have joined the masses on ‘a perfectly good walk’ to get you out in the fresh air and keep healthy, without the risk of pneumonia or (worse still) ‘hat hair’ for the rest of the day. And there was nothing particularly accomplished about our trip to the beach: no fitness records broken, no significant calories burnt (I did mention it was a ‘dip’ didn’t I??). But who’s to say with the many health benefits cold water swimming gives, that my version isn’t better for you? I just have a different view of what’s fun…

And it’s the same in any business to a degree. You need to have different points of view to see the options available to you: diverse perspectives and experiences which don’t mirror your own.

Over the past few years, it’s become clear that a key way to accelerate your business performance is to become more diverse and inclusive. Gartner found that the difference in performance between diverse teams was 12% more positive than non-diverse teams and Fast Company reported that those companies with higher gender diversity and engagement experience up to 48 – 56% stronger financial performance than others.

Yet ‘Diversity’ as a word in my experience has tended to anaesthetise or polarise many in SMEs. Either they zone out on the basis that it’s not something they need to concern themselves about (I’m not sexist/ racist/ ageist/ ableist so we’re doing good, right?),  they associate it with something that only ‘big’ companies’ need to get their head around or that it’s just too hard.

And I understand that to a degree. Because taking action on diversity and inclusivity isn’t passive and takes energy. Energy to sit and listen to other’s experiences who do not mirror your own view of the world, a growth mindset that is open to the fact that there is more you can learn on a regular basis and then take action to change what needs to. And who has any energy left after such a bumper year?!

But with increased data on the impact of diversity (from the positive it brings to the negative when it’s not present) and key world events such as the killing of George Floyd sparking candid conversations in the workplace, it’s not something anyone can ignore.

And there are many things you can do whether your team is made up of 5 or 500 people.

  • Re-think your strategy and be as intentional with planning diversity & inclusion as you are with planning out your sales.
  • It all starts at the beginning… So get real in your advertising and think about the words you are using to describe the candidates you are looking for. Make sure any job adverts are inclusive by checking for the sentiment they convey and don’t include a wish list which doesn’t actually describe what you are looking for. Is it really essential that this person has over ten years experience in a specific type of environment at a senior level? Because if it is, then you might have unwittingly just ruled out anyone who’s ever had a career break. Surely you want someone who’s delivered the best results and in which case, change your criteria (and your questions later).

  • Shortlist a blend of candidates: The next time you go to hire, ask the person helping you with your hiring to provide a representative group of candidates in the mix. It’ll be tough in some industries, but challenge yourself (and them) to do so.

  • Highlight the unconscious bias that sits in all of us: Make everyone who is interviewing candidates watch at least 3 of the videos in Facebook’s series of unconscious bias training. They take about 15 minutes each, can be watched over lunch and I guarantee will have people thinking more about their own unconscious biases and the impact of them. This isn’t a male or female ‘thing’. We’re all in this one together.

  • Promote those people who are underrepresented in your business. And I don’t mean promote them to a new role all the time. But promote and recognise their accomplishments, encourage them to showcase their work internally and externally and act as a champion for them.

  • Find role models to mentor these team members: if you can’t find any internal mentors then provide external help or encourage them to join networking groups in your industry where they can find support.

  • Offer greater flexibility. More so than ever people have opened up to the idea of flexible working, historically something which has helped women progress their careers.

It really does take all sorts to build a business. Well, a successful one at least.

If you want to chat about how you can encourage diversity & inclusivity in your team, then drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk or call 0203 627 7048

Image: Canva

Mission Impossible? Getting Performance Right In An SME

Mission Impossible? Getting Performance Right In An SME

Whilst the everyday discussion of performance does not (to most I hope) harbour potential disasters of such epic proportions as the explosions common to any one of the Mission Impossible series of films, confidence and success in this area for many businesses can seem as unattainable as overcoming a threat against the annihilation of all humans or being able to recreate ‘that’ memorable heist scene which saw Mr. Cruise landing just a couple of inches from the floor. And be just as sweat inducing too…..

Over 60% of our clients here at TheHRhub in the last year have had concerns and challenges with their team in the area we’ll collectively call (for the purposes of this post) ‘performance management’, reflecting our experience as in-house practitioners that this is one of the most common areas of concern for business leaders and showing that despite its many evolutions or size of company, most have just not cracked it yet.

Most leaders instinctively understand that being able to share what they’re trying to achieve, what they see each person bringing to that party and that having a transparent way of checking progress against this is going to be key to keeping everyone’s performance on track, yet far from providing clarity over a way of doing this, somehow wrapping it all up in the term ‘performance management’ and creating a process around it serves only to confuse matters.

So before people lose the will to live over finding the perfect ‘process’ (there isn’t one btw) in what is too important an area not to take seriously in a business, we share what we feel are some fundamentals to bear in mind in this area.

Purpose matters when it comes to any new process, so be clear on why you’re you’re spending time having these conversations. Is your vision clear to all and will this help? Trying to give the team support? Are you you trying to get alignment? Trying to build communication? Drive accountability? Transparency? Or all of the above and more. You may not get it right initially but by being clear to the team over your expectations in any performance management process, you’re taking a very important first step.

Timing is also important (but don’t let it drag you down…). I’ve always been a fan of the little-and-often approach and you’ll have no doubt read countless articles in the last year or so on how the annual appraisal is ‘dead’, not applicable to today’s workforce and not a thing which millennials would dirty their hands with….. However if once a year is currently the only time that you meet with your team members, then for goodness sake make sure you keep that diary appointment!

There’s nothing wrong with starting with the basics. If you don’t feel you have the dedicated time, skills or energy to pull together a bells-and-whistles program, then start little (and often) with every manager having 1-2-1 conversations to build on.  By talking to your team members regularly and agreeing what they’re going to be focussed on, how you’re going to both communicate progress and what you need to do to remove any blockers in doing so, you’re doing better than about 70% of businesses.  

To ‘rate’ or ‘not to rate?’ is a much debated question. And to be honest, there’s no real right or wrong here. Personally speaking I find that when discussing how someone is developing in their role, understanding what motivates them and how they can deliver more of what they do well in a business, that then distilling said efforts and the results they’ve achieved into one single number doesn’t exactly elicit the spike in motivation for the majority of cases. True, being given a ‘high’ rating is probably likely to a smile inside many, but then the same can be said for some well thought out feedback which shows encouragement and recognition. And if you are going to go with ratings? Maybe stop shy of having the 15 (!) levels one particular business I know constructed in their process…. 

Online tools can help manage the consistency side of this for you too (nudging you when it’s time to chat just in case you forget, giving you tips on how to discuss issues) but I’m afraid that nothing is going to replace good old fashioned practice and regularity in this regard. Manage this and your teams will be flying. Because whilst many may complain about form filling or query what their objectives were, I’ve never ever heard an employee say that they didn’t appreciate spending time with their manager and discussing how they can do better.

Like many sound practices, it’s not impossible to achieve results in this area in a reasonably swift time, but it does take focus, persistence and regularity.

Think you’ve cracked it? Congratulations. And now might just be the time to answer that advert for MI6 you saw encrypted….

For others who want help in unlocking your team’s performance, give us a bell for a free chat to discuss how we can help you via hello@thehrhub.co.ukor 0203 627 7048.

Image: iStock

How to Inspire Loyalty Like a Bodyguard

How to Inspire Loyalty Like a Bodyguard

You may have noticed that over the past few weeks, the nation has been gripped by ‘Bodyguard’ fever: the television series most watched on the BBC all year, which has been the topic of numerous ‘water cooler’ conversations at work. Centred around the ongoing threat and execution of terrorist events and the impact of these on the Government, Security Services, Police and Armed forces, at the core of this drama is the concept of ‘loyalty’: who has it and to whom are they faithful?

So far, no different to a myriad of other dramas attempting to draw viewers. Here however the storyline is brilliantly balanced (and just a little bit too close to real life events we’ve seen to be dismissed as never-gonna-happen-here…), the acting even better and the ending…..well, far be it for me to unlock any spoilers for those who haven’t quite caught up on iPlayer, but suffice it to say it strikes again the right proportion of the believable and the shocking. And that’s because across all the goodies and baddies we meet in the series, across all the multiple plot lines, flaws and strengths are presented to us which are uniquely human and recognisable, with many coming from the type of loyalties which we see in ourselves in everyday life.

Of course, before we take the analogies too far, most of us after all aren’t likely to ever need or want to ‘take a bullet’ for our leader (it would bring a whole new meaning to ‘taking one for the team’…) however people take all sorts of action and inaction in the name of loyalty: they defend, attack and work hard for those they are loyal to. If your team are loyal to you, they’re going to care if you win the deal or not and put in the hours to help you secure it. If your team are loyal to you, they’ll travel to the ends of the earth for you (or even to that meeting in Bognor Regis someone’s slipped in their diary for 4pm on a Friday night…). And if your team are loyal to you, they’ll think twice about replying to that message received from a recruiter who’s been stalking them on LinkedIn…..

There are many ways to inspire and earn the type of loyalty which will transform your business but we’ve cherry picked our favourites below to give you a headstart:

  • Include others in the conversation. Listen to what your team are saying ( and also to what they’re not saying) as a healthy team is one where constructive dialogue and challenge is welcomed. So if your team is tight lipped or never offers anything more than a murmured ‘whatever you say boss’ to everything you suggest or ask, then now might be time to do a bit more listening than telling. Not sure how to do this?
  • Be a little bit vulnerable yourself: you certainly don’t need to take the lead from Hawe’s character in Episode 3 and have a ‘pre-conference’ moment yourself with a member of your team (in fact please don’t unless you want someone to take the lead in bringing some sort of harassment allegation against you) however disclosing information about yourself, including how you feel and what challenges you also may be up against, helps others to feel that they themselves can open up themselves a bit more too. It helps build trust and cement good relationships.
  • Stand back. People will not show you their best selves if you are looking over their shoulder constantly or lurking in that Google doc you’ve shared with them watching every keystroke and willing it to populate (yes, they can see you doing this – that’s why they’re called ‘live’ documents!). They will instead show you signs of anxiety and (probably) frustration. But never the flourish you are looking for. Period.
  • Treat people with respect: this includes not hiding bad news when it surfaces and not avoiding difficult conversations. Many years after I left one particular company I would have gone out of my way to recommend them as a brilliant place to work, despite the fact that my exit came shortly after writing my own redundancy letter*. The reason? Despite the P45, throughout my time with them, they had always been upfront with the bad news and treated me like an adult. And you’d be surprised at how uncommon that is….

But the biggest way to inspire loyalty?  I’ll give you a hint: it’s not the people working for you who should be taking on the role of Bodyguard. As their leader, it is you who should have their back. The one who should support and look out for them. Any team who doesn’t feel they have the support of their leader is not one which will feel loyalty. And in turn, all honesty, performance and discretionary effort flies out of the window along with all those ideas which may just help you become the next Apple, Google or Amazon….

For help in inspiring your own brand of employee loyalty in your team, drop us a line via hello@thehrhub.co.uk or 0203 627 7048.

Image: Photo by Paulius Dragunas on Unsplash

*It’s very common in HR-land to do this I promise. I mean, who else are you going to ask?

The Bad HR Habits Of Good Bosses – How Many Are YOU Guilty Of?

The Bad HR Habits Of Good Bosses – How Many Are YOU Guilty Of?

Even the most well-meaning of leaders can fall into habitual behaviours that can have a negative impact on their people. It’s the same as eating or drinking too much,  it’s only when things spiral out of control that you realise you’ve got a problem.

Here are some of the bad HR habits we’ve witnessed over the years. And the good news is they’re easy to fix….

Carrying Out Annual Reviews On An Annual Basis

Hang on a sec – why exactly is this a bad habit?? Shouldn’t you be making sure that performance discussions do take place?? Of course you should. But if they’re only happening once a year, then you’re missing a trick. Managing and improving performance needs to be built into your everyday working practices. If it’s not, then you can’t realistically expect to improve productivity.

Getting Stuck In The Filing Cabinet

You don’t need us to tell you that the world of business is moving faster than ever before. You’re probably using online tactics when it comes to your sales and marketing, for example, but what about HR? It could be time to ditch the notion that HR lives in the filing cabinet, and bring your business up to speed. Online systems with good security are as secure as any filing cabinets and will often save you time and hassle with your HR Admin.

Thinking That Training And Learning Are One And The Same

There’s no denying that training can be expensive. Send a few employees to a conference, book in some places on an external course, or bring in a professional trainer for a couple of days, and your bill will be hefty. Sometimes, formal training is essential and/or advisable: when you’re rolling out new software, when your team require a recognised qualification etc. But what’s arguably much more important is ongoing learning within the workplace. Nurturing your talent isn’t a one-off event – it’s about what happens in your business on a day-to-day basis. So get to it with those lunch and learn sessions, involve all the team in what they can all learn from each other and challenge your team to show what they’ve learnt on an on-going basis.

Hogging All The Decision Making

As the boss you may be thinking: but that’s what I’m here for! Obviously there are some key decisions that only you and your top team should be making, but imagine how much time you would free up in your life if others around you came up with a range of solutions to the things which had been stopping you from sleeping for most of the previous night, gave you ideas for your next product or sorted out problems they had about the office move between themselves…. Allowing and encouraging your team to make decisions (or at least contribute to them by involving them) inspires trust and confidence which can pay you back massive returns in terms of loyalty and engagement, not to mention the innovation which can come from a varied viewpoint.

Being self-aware enough to recognise and correct your own bad habits is a hugely positive example to show your team. Even more so if you’ve had the courage to ask for their opinions first.

For help or advice on any HR issue get in touch today at hello@thehrhub.co.uk.co.uk or call 0203 627 7048 to speak to our team direct. We’re offering a free initial review to help you understand how to make the valuable changes to best support your business.

Image: Canva