INSIGHTS

follow us here and on twitter @ukhrhub to get all the latest HR hints, tips, advice and news

HR helpdesk – Policies every SME should know

Everyone realises that you are meant to have some kind of ‘HR’ function, but when you are busy growing an sme, all the focus is on just that, so stepping back to write policies and procedures tends to get pushed to the bottom of the list.

Then you have a little freak out moment and realise your HR framework could make or break you. The information age gives everyone knowledge at their fingertips and if you haven’t thought about it, you can be sure your employees will be quick to point out their rights if anything goes awry.  In the early days this could be even more crucial as any hiccup in those early hiring stages could be enough to cause a financial hit you simply can’t take.

Luckily for you, we’re here to tell you which ones you need and which ones are considered best practice.

Writing policies and procedures can be a minefield in this day and age so where do you start? 

Legal requirements

Surprisingly there are only 3 policies you should provide that are required by law. They are:

  • Disciplinary and Dismissal Policy
  • Grievance Policy
  • Health and Safety Policy (needed by law if you employ over 5 employees)

Best practice

There are also a number of other policies that you should provide because they have legal minimum requirements – these are…..

Pay Legally you must pay your employees at least the National Minimum wage and ensure Equal Pay; you must also provide an itemised pay statement and not make any unauthorised deductions from employees pay
Equal Opportunities Legally you must not discriminate against staff or allow harassment and bullying and you must make reasonable adjustments for staff in the work-place if they are disabled
Working Hours and Overtime including rest-breaks and holidays Legally you must comply with Working Time Regulations provisions for employees and workers
Sickness policy and unauthorised/authorised absence  Legally you must make statutory sick pay payments to employees and allow them time off for dependant emergencies, Jury Service etc.
Maternity, Adoption, Paternity Leave, Parental Leave and Shared Parental leave You must make statutory maternity / adoption / paternity payments to employees and give the appropriate leave
Flexible Working You must consider all employees flexible working requests

Finally you may wish to consider additional policies to ensure consistency within your business, for example:

  • personal e-mail / internet usage
  • alcohol/drugs in the workplace
  • dress codes
  • data protection
  • Expenses
  • Smoking rules

There are no legal guidelines for these policies and they can be designed around the needs of your business (e.g, no smoking – including vaping – other than during lunch hour).  

You should only put policies in pace that are going to be used.  Having a policy just for the sake of it is pointless! Focus, keep it simple and write policies which are meaningful to your business. Then stand by them.

TheHRhub is the ultimate online HR support service for Startups and SMEs – providing software, templates, expert advice, white papers and up to date news and views, straight to your mobile or tablet. It’s like having an HR director in your pocket but without the price tag!

Call us on 0203 627 7048 or drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk for a no-strings chat about your HR needs.

Image : Pixabay

HR Surgery: What HR Policies Do SMEs Really Need?

HR Surgery: What HR Policies Do SMEs Really Need?

Navigating the intricacies of HR and People policies can be a daunting task, especially for startups and SMEs who are focused on growth. Often, the creation of HR policies and procedures is relegated to the bottom of the priority list until an urgent realisation hits: the success or failure of your HR framework can significantly impact your business.

In an era where information is readily accessible, it’s crucial to have a solid HR foundation from the outset to both set expectations as well as avoid potential financial setbacks due to early HR missteps. Fortunately, this guide is here to separate your MustHaves from your NicetoHave Policies for your startup or SME, so that you’re clear on what you need to have in place.

Legal Requirements

Surprisingly there is only a handful of policies that are required by law for a business to have:

  • Disciplinary and Dismissal Policy: spell out how you will resolve concerns that you have
  • Grievance Policy: spell out how you will resolve concerns that your team have
  • Health and Safety Policy: What are you doing to 
  • Maternity, Adoption, Paternity Leave, Parental Leave and Shared Parental leave

Beyond Compliance: Best Practices

Beyond the legal mandates however, several policies are advisable due to their legal minimum requirements: your HR game with policies that aren’t just about ticking boxes but enhancing your team’s experience and your company’s culture.

Pay Legally you must pay your employees at least the National Minimum wage and ensure Equal Pay; you must also provide an itemised pay statement and not make any unauthorised deductions from employees pay
Equal Opportunities Legally you must not discriminate against staff or allow harassment and bullying and you must make reasonable adjustments for staff in the work-place if they are disabled
Working Hours and Overtime including rest-breaks and holidays Legally you must comply with Working Time Regulations provisions for employees and workers
Sickness policy and unauthorised/authorised absence  Legally you must make statutory sick pay payments to employees and allow them time off for dependant emergencies, Jury Service etc.
Bullying and harassment You should communicate the standards you expect and how you will manage any situations where someone feels that they have been bullied or harassed.
Flexible Working You must consider all employees flexible working requests from Day 1

And finally, think about what policies which resonate with your unique culture and operational style and which promote consistency in your team. Some of these can include:

  • Social Media
  • Personal e-mail / Internet Usage
  • Alcohol/Drugs In The Workplace
  • Dress Codes
  • Expenses
  • Smoking/ Vaping

There are no legal guidelines for these policies and they can be designed around the needs of your business. For example, no smoking (including e-cigarettes) other than during lunch hour.

Where Do I Start?

When it comes to writing HR policies for startups and SMEs, copious content is not king .  There are millions of pages of policies & procedures rotting away completely unused stuck in the metaphorical filing cabinet that is the cloud that will attest to this fact. Don’t get fooled into thinking that you need a policy for every eventuality – you don’t. And in fact, too many draconian policies can be restrictive to a small business that is growing.   

The types of policies that you need depend on your business type: what’s going to be right for an accountancy firm might not be right for a manufacturing plant and what’s right for a company of 10 people might not work when you hit 100. So think about where you want to set standards.

It is essential to create realistic employment policies – and then be consistent in their use. Do what you say as well as what you do. For example, using a policy to pay lip service to health and safety or treating employees fairly is not enough. If the worst happens and a problem ends up in court or at an employment tribunal, you’ll need to be able to show that you put your company policies into practice.

Communication Is Key

Policies can be part of your employee/company handbook or you can set them out in a separate document. However, for your discipline and grievance policies, you must either set them out in a written statement of main terms and conditions of employment or refer in a written statement to a place where the employee can find them.

You should ensure that you make staff aware that your policies exist. The best time to do this is during the induction process (which doesn’t have to be a 3 day off site event but can be something as simple as a checklist to ensure that a new employee to your company has all the relevant information that they need). You should also make sure that employees can easily access policies if necessary, by having them pinned up on a noticeboard for example or, again, on the company intranet.

Contractual Or Not?

The policies of an SME generally aren’t contractually binding unless they expressly stated otherwise.  However, the terms of some policies could be seen as contractually binding through custom and practice e.g. where employees follow certain working practices or receive certain benefits over a significant period of time. You need to  be conscious of this as ultimately it will be up to an Employment Tribunal to decide on the contractual nature of policies if a claim were ever to be brought against your company.

Never-Ending Updates

Policies are never finished and you must ensure that you regularly review your policies and procedures to ensure that they are up to date, reflect the needs of the business and reflect any legislative changes.

Effective Company Policies

Whatever your policies cover, there are 2 key principles we recommend to make a policy effective

  1. Make sure any policy is clear
  2. Make sure that any policy is communicated to employees. Unless employees understand a policy it will not work.

You don’t want to tie yourself or your managers up with too many rules as this will only prove to be restrictive to day to day operations. Equally policies and procedures must be realistic, meaningful and be something that you and your management team are prepared to stand by. There is no point in stating that persistent lateness is a disciplinary offence and then not disciplining the one employee who is late every Monday morning. This type of approach will only lead employees to the conclusion that policies are meaningless, making them almost impossible for you to enforce.  

For further advice and support on policy implementation, or any other HR issues contact theHRhub today on 0203 627 7048 or drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk

Photo by Andrew Pons on Unsplash

Why You Should Never Download Your People Policies Online

If you’re like most employers, then the very first time you realised you needed some people policies to make sure that you’re compliant with the law and/or drive performance and engagement, you probably carried out a quick Google search to grab what you needed or dug out the old ones from your last firm. Sound familiar?

And for many it seems like the obvious place to start. After all, “in Google we trust” is the mantra of many….

But sometimes of course, it pays to exercise more than just a little bit of caution. You’d hope to know better than to search for specific medical advice online (“there you go, there might just be the need for the 7 years plus medical school training after all” being the words muttered by my husband’s consultant as the patient in question had just wrongly diagnosed any eye injury), or just hope for the best when it comes to pulling your finances together… So would you really risk a search engine to give you the policies and templates that have the power to make or destroy your business??

Here’s why you might want to have a rethink…

You Have No Real Idea Where Your Advice Is Coming From

You don’t have to be an expert legal advisor, or even an HR consultant, to knock up a website and share your views and opinions online. Pretty much anyone with a laptop and the patience to watch a few YouTube videos can do it. You might say that it would be pretty pointless for someone to intentionally give you the wrong advice, and that’s probably true. But it’s not worth leaving anything to chance.

Working with a skilled HR professional will make sure that your documentation is informed by legal requirements and cutting-edge best practice.

The Law Changes Regularly

What applies right now in terms of good HR advice isn’t necessarily going to be good advice 6 months from now. New legislation is released on a regular basis, and it’s your job to make sure that you are compliant.

When you access information and templates online, you can never be certain when they were last updated. Of course, we always keep you up to date with what you really need to know, so it pays to sign up for our free updates.

One Size Doesn’t Necessarily Fit All

It’s true that the law applies across the board, regardless of what kind of business you run. You’re not exempt from following the rules just because you have just a few employees, for example. Still though, there are certain things that only apply to businesses of a certain size, and what works for a large multinational corporation isn’t necessarily going to work for a small family business.

When you work with a professional to get what you need, you can ensure that your practices are fit for purpose. Your HR consultant can get to know your individual needs, and craft a strategy accordingly.

There are times in your business when doing a few online searches is going to give you exactly what you need. But when it comes to managing your most valuable asset – your people – it’s never worth cutting corners.

If you’re concerned about whether your practices are hitting the mark, get in touch today and we can have a no-obligation chat about where you stand, and what your options are. Call us on 0203 627 7048 or drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk

Image: Canva

Check Over Your HR Policies To Protect You & Your Employees This Christmas

The lead up to Christmas can be a bit of an HR minefield. Absence, sickness, expenses and office socialising are all potentially at their highest over the next few weeks. And you’d be wise to check over and circulate your HR policies now so everyone knows what is and is not acceptable in your organisation. Remember that in specifying the boundaries in your workplace you are protecting your employees as well as telling them where the line is….

But writing policies and procedures can be tricky in this day and age. You could spend hours writing and tweaking policies for your business – whatever its size. Online you will find a plethora of policy templates. As a small company though, you don’t necessarily need all of these. You should only put policies in place that are going to be used.  Having a policy for the sake of it is pointless!  Write policies which are meaningful and stand by them.

Legal Requirements

Surprisingly there are only 3 policies that are required by law.

These are:

Best Practice

There are also a number of policies that you should provide because they have legal minimum requirements.

These are:

Pay Legally you must pay your employees at least the National Minimum wage and ensure Equal Pay; you must also provide an itemised pay statement and not make any unauthorised deductions from employees pay
Equal Opportunities Legally you must not discriminate against staff or allow harassment and bullying and you must make reasonable adjustments for staff in the work-place if they are disabled
Working Hours and Overtime including rest-breaks and holidays Legally  you must comply with Working Time Regulations provisions for employees and workers
Sickness policy and unauthorised/authorised absence  Legally you must make statutory sick pay payments to employees and allow them time off for dependant emergencies, Jury Service etc.
Maternity, Adoption, Paternity Leave, Parental Leave and Shared Parental leave You must make statutory maternity / adoption / paternity payments to employees and give the appropriate leave
Flexible Working You must consider all employees flexible working requests

There are few other policies that you could consider to ensure consistency within your business. Policies that may well seem all the more relevant with Christmas round the corner: 

For example:

  • Personal e-mail / Internet Usage
  • Alcohol/Drugs In The Workplace
  • Dress Codes
  • Data Protection
  • Expenses
  • Smoking

There are no legal guidelines for these policies and they can be designed around the needs of your business. For example, no smoking (including e-cigarettes) other than during lunch hour.

Where Do I Start?

When it comes to writing policies copious content is not king.  There are millions of pages of policies & procedures rotting away completely unused in filing cabinets and shared network folders that will attest to this fact. Don’t get fooled into thinking that you need a policy for every eventuality – you don’t. And in fact, too many draconian policies can be restrictive to a small business that is growing.   

The types of policies that you need depend on your business type: If your employees operate heavy machinery then you should consider putting in a Drugs & Alcohol Usage Policy but if you are an accountancy firm then this policy is unlikely to be a priority for you.

It is essential to create realistic employment policies – and enforce them. Using a policy to pay lip service to health and safety or treating employees fairly is not enough. If the worst happens and a problem ends up in court or at an employment tribunal, you’ll need to be able to show that you put your company policies into practice.

Communication Is Key

Policies can be part of your employee/company handbook or you can set them out in a separate document. However, for your discipline and grievance policies, you must either set them out in a written statement of main terms and conditions of employment or refer in a written statement to a place where the employee can read them, such as the company intranet.

You should ensure that you make staff aware that your policies exist. The best time to do this is during the induction process (which doesn’t have to be a 3 day off site event but can be something as simple as a checklist to ensure that a new employee to your company has all the relevant information that they need). You should also make sure that employees can easily access policies if necessary, by having them pinned up on a noticeboard for example or, again, on the company intranet.

Contractual Or Not?

Policies generally aren’t contractually binding unless they expressly state otherwise.  However, the terms of some policies could be seen as contractually binding through custom and practice e.g. where employees follow certain working practices or receive certain benefits over a significant period of time. You need to  be conscious of this as ultimately it will be up to an Employment Tribunal to decide on the contractual nature of policies if a claim were ever to be brought against your company.

Never-Ending Updates

Policies are never finished and you must ensure that you regularly review your policies and procedures to ensure that they are up to date, reflect the needs of the business and reflect any legislative changes.

Effective Company Policies

Whatever your policies cover, you should follow 2 essential principles to make a company policy effective.

1 – Make sure any policy is clear

2 – Make sure that any policy is communicated to employees. Unless employees understand a policy it will not work.

You do not want to tie yourself or your managers up with too many rules as this will only prove to be restrictive to day to day operations.  Equally policies and procedures must be realistic, meaningful and be something that you and your management team are prepared to stand by. There is no point in stating that persistent lateness is a disciplinary offence and then not disciplining the one employee who is late every Monday morning. This type of approach will only lead employees to the conclusion that policies are meaningless, making them almost impossible for you to enforce.  

theHRhub – on line and on demand HR support for startups and SMEs

For further advice and support on policy implementation, sign up to theHRhub today.

Image: Canva

HR Policies: Everything SMEs Need To Know

Writing policies and procedures can be a mine-field in this day and age. You could spend hours writing and tweaking policies for your business – whatever its size. Online you will find a plethora of policy templates. But as a small company you don’t necessarily need all of these. You should only put policies in place that are going to be used.  Having a policy for the sake of it is pointless!  Write policies which are meaningful and stand by them.

Legal Requirements

Surprisingly there are only 3 policies that are required by law.

These are:

Best Practice

There are also a number of policies that you should provide because they have legal minimum requirements.

These are:

 

Pay Legally you must pay your employees at least the National Minimum wage and ensure Equal Pay; you must also provide an itemised pay statement and not make any unauthorised deductions from employees pay
Equal Opportunities Legally you must not discriminate against staff or allow harassment and bullying and you must make reasonable adjustments for staff in the work-place if they are disabled
Working Hours and Overtime including rest-breaks and holidays Legally  you must comply with Working Time Regulations provisions for employees and workers
Sickness policy and unauthorised/authorised absence  Legally you must make statutory sick pay payments to employees and allow them time off for dependant emergencies, Jury Service etc.
Maternity, Adoption, Paternity Leave, Parental Leave and Shared Parental leave You must make statutory maternity / adoption / paternity payments to employees and give the appropriate leave
Flexible Working You must consider all employees flexible working requests

 

There are few other policies that you could  consider to ensure consistency within your business.

For example:

  • Personal e-mail / Internet Usage
  • Alcohol/Drugs In The Workplace
  • Dress Codes
  • Data Protection
  • Expenses
  • Smoking

There are no legal guidelines for these policies and they can be designed around the needs of your business. For example, no smoking (including e-cigarettes) other than during lunch hour.

Where Do I Start?

When it comes to writing policies copious content is not king.  There are millions of pages of policies & procedures rotting away completely unused in filing cabinets and shared network folders that will attest to this fact. Don’t get fooled into thinking that you need a policy for every eventuality – you don’t. And in fact, too many draconian policies can be restrictive to a small business that is growing.   

The types of policies that you need depend on your business type: If your employees operate heavy machinery then you should consider putting in a Drugs & Alcohol Usage Policy but if you are an accountancy firm then this policy is unlikely to be a priority for you.

It is essential to create realistic employment policies – and enforce them. Using a policy to pay lip service to health and safety or treating employees fairly is not enough. If the worst happens and a problem ends up in court or at an employment tribunal, you’ll need to be able to show that you put your company policies into practice.

Communication Is Key

Policies can be part of your employee/company handbook or you can set them out in a separate document. However, for your discipline and grievance policies, you must either set them out in a written statement of main terms and conditions of employment or refer in a written statement to a place where the employee can read them, such as the company intranet.

You should ensure that you make staff aware that your policies exist. The best time to do this is during the induction process (which doesn’t have to be a 3 day off site event but can be something as simple as a checklist to ensure that a new employee to your company has all the relevant information that they need). You should also make sure that employees can easily access policies if necessary, by having them pinned up on a noticeboard for example or, again, on the company intranet.

Contractual Or Not?

Policies generally aren’t contractually binding unless they expressly state otherwise.  However, the terms of some policies could be seen as contractually binding through custom and practice e.g. where employees follow certain working practices or receive certain benefits over a significant period of time. You need to  be conscious of this as ultimately it will be up to an Employment Tribunal to decide on the contractual nature of policies if a claim were ever to be brought against your company.

Never-Ending Updates

Policies are never finished and you must ensure that you regularly review your policies and procedures to ensure that they are up to date, reflect the needs of the business and reflect any legislative changes.

Effective Company Policies

Whatever your policies cover, you should follow 2 essential principles to make a company policy effective.

1 – Make sure any policy is clear

2 – Make sure that any policy is communicated to employees. Unless employees understand a policy it will not work.

You do not want to tie yourself or your managers up with too many rules as this will only prove to be restrictive to day to day operations.  Equally policies and procedures must be realistic, meaningful and be something that you and your management team are prepared to stand by. There is no point in stating that persistent lateness is a disciplinary offence and then not disciplining the one employee who is late every Monday morning. This type of approach will only lead employees to the conclusion that policies are meaningless, making them almost impossible for you to enforce.  

For further advice and support on policy implementation, sign up to theHRhub today.

Photo Credit: Resolution #4 – become more organised by Victoria Pickering

 

HR Horrors: Steering Clear Of Social Media Meltdowns In The Workplace

HR Horrors: Steering Clear Of Social Media Meltdowns In The Workplace

There are definitely nights we all come home from work wanting to have a bit of a rant about the latest office politics. But in the digital age, where a single tweet can spiral into a storm and a Facebook post can ferment into a fiasco, the line between professional restraint and personal ranting has never been thinner.

For the vast majority of people, they recognise that this kind of chat is best reserved for their partner or BFF’s to discuss face to face rather than taking to the masses via Facebook/ Twitter/ Tik Tok as a necessary release valve (not least because if you’ve ever done this and paid attention to those around you, you might have just noticed some eyes glazing over….).

However, when these vents turn digital and public, the consequences can reverberate far beyond our immediate circle, especially if you’re connected with your team on social media ( read our post ‘Is it ever a good idea to be Facebook Friends with your Employees‘ for our take on this particular minefield…).

When you spot a post which is less-than-complimentary about your own workplace/ management style or one of your other colleagues , as a leader, aside from the sharp intake of breath you’ll likely have, your reaction could go any number of ways.

The obvious thing to say to avoid something like this happening of course, is to make it clear to everyone joining the business that it’s not acceptable (in any instance) to slag off the company and specify that action will be taken should they do so.

But what if you’re too late?

These circumstances present a unique set of challenges. And if you find yourself in this situation, it’s really important that you know exactly what to do to address the problems and get things back on the right track.

Speed is everything 

Act quickly (but calmly). First, capture the moment: take screenshots of the problematic post. Then, reach out to request its removal. While you might want to launch straight into damage control, arrange a face-to-face meeting or, if that’s not possible, a phone call. This isn’t the time for digital diplomacy; misunderstandings are less likely when you can hear the tone and see the face behind the words.

Listen before you leap

Don’t jump to any assumptions before you’ve got all the information, listen to what they have to say before taking any action on the situation. Consider the nature of the comments made and their likely impact on your organisation. It would help if you can give examples of the gravitas that their words could have on your business, staff, customers and clients and what information is regarded as confidential in the business, before discussing what (if any)  penalties that may need to be considered in this situation.

It’s easy for any of us to jump to Defcon Level 5 when we spot something that’s close to our heart, however when considering your response and any actions, try not to let emotions overcome common sense and keep everything in perspective. It helps at this stage to involve someone else in your business or HR team member to offer some objectivity.  If the remarks have caused offence to other employees within your organisation, treat them with respect and take the appropriate action to record their views, as any disciplinary measures will need to take this into account and be documented.

Nobody wants to have difficult conversations, as a leader though, it’s your duty. Addressing these issues head-on not only resolves current conflicts but also sets a precedent and tone for company culture and expectations.

A gentle reminder goes a long way 

You want to get a grip on the situation quickly, treat it with severity but equally keep your cool and don’t blow things out of proportion. Just by being proactive and nipping it in the bud can help you get things back on the right track without any hassle or fuss and sometimes examples need to be made but no one wants to lose a good employee if it can be avoided. A simple guideline should be enough to avoid further scenarios cropping up.  For example, a company wide note to say what company issues you regard as private (e.g disputes, working conditions, complaints about management etc) should be addressed to you, their manager or HR and not discussed on social media;

Social networking can be an excuse for avoiding face-to-face conversations by many.

Often a quiet word by a manager can avoid issues that lead to disciplinary and grievance problems. Emails, texts and messaging systems can leave managers reliant on communicating electronically, so lead by example, enjoy more face to face conversations or calls, where the correct tone of voice can be heard and miscommunication can be instantly corrected.

If you have concerns about how equipped you are to manage HR policies and procedures, then we can help. We’ll pinpoint any potential issues that are at play in your workplace, and give you practical advice around what you need to do next.

theHRhub is the ultimate online HR support service for Startups and SMEs – providing software, templates, expert advice and up to date news and views, straight to your mobile or tablet. It’s like having an HR director in your pocket but without the price tag!

Call us on 0203 627 7048 or drop us a line at hello@thehrhub.co.uk for a no-strings chat about your HR needs.

Jog on January 🏃

Jog on January 🏃

The park was bitter this morning, yet still brimming with those keen people working their way around the perimeter: showing off their Christmas kit, nearly half way through the month and towards their January goals, a symphony of Sweaty Betty, Under Armour and Lululemon.

I however was on a more gentle path. Having committed to my own fitness goals for this month (I’m down with the NY drill just as much as the next person…)  and even going so far as kitting up myself with my own new fancy leggings and trail shoes over the Christmas period,  my personal journey however started with a bang and very quickly turned to a cough and splutter as a rogue Winter lurghy took hold of our household. This left me bed bound and bathing in Olbas oil for several days. Not quite the New Years plans that are worth a post on Insta…. 

A few years ago I may well have forsaken my rest and ploughed on through or felt guilty as hell that I’d already failed to keep up with nailing my goals at only the two week mark. But perhaps it’s something to do with approaching an ahem, ‘significant’ birthday this year, that I’m far more attuned to my health than I used to be. And so, rest I did. 

I decided to surrender to whatever was breathing up my body and just ease myself into January, however it showed up this year. I didn’t put pressure on myself, I didn’t beat myself up. And despite having some pretty specific things I wanted to achieve this first couple of weeks, I acknowledged that sometimes, despite the best of intentions, plans go awry and it’s best just to gently change your course. 

And it’s the same with your People goals. It may not be illness that’s holding you up from making progress on your intentions in this department, but another change in circumstance or just good old fashioned procrastination that hits us all from time to time. Either way, just ease yourself in gently by looking at a couple of things which are going to help your team’s performance this year.

Instead of killing yourself to make sure all your team have a full set of OKRs by the end of the month, how about doing some of the following instead: 

  • Catch up individually: just working through having catch ups with each of them, making sure they’re clear on what you want them to prioritise for this first quarter, but also ensuring that they have the support they need to achieve these goals. These catch-ups can be informal and more about connecting with your team members on a personal level. Understand their own goals for the year as well as challenges, and offer guidance that aligns with their individual strengths..
  • Adopt a Flexible Approach to Goal Setting: Given the unpredictability of current times, setting rigid goals might not be the best approach. Encourage a flexible mindset where goals can adapt to changing circumstances. This approach reduces pressure on both you and your team and fosters an environment where everyone feels more in control and less stressed about the unknown.
  • Implement Gratitude Practices: Encourage team members to share small wins or things they are grateful for in team meetings, fostering a positive work environment.
  • Introduce wellness walks: January is a great month to introduce small wellness initiatives that don’t require a lot of effort but have significant impact. This could include lunchtime walk and talk meetings to kill two birds with one stone!
  • Be Available and Approachable: Finally, make sure that you are available and approachable. Sometimes, team members just need to know that they can come to you with their concerns or ideas. Open-door policies, regular one-on-ones, or simply checking in with your team can make a huge difference in how supported they feel.

If you’re interested in cutting down your to-do lists and getting the experts in to help you take your People & HR plans to the next level, contact us via  hello@thehrhub.co.uk or call on 020 3951 1208

Events

Events

Upcoming Events Our 50 minute Lunch and Learn style sessions are designed to introduce you to our associate experts and educate and inspire you on ways you can boost your business even more. Empowering Working Parents with Bread & Butter Friday 14 June 12 noon...
Templates

Templates

Templates   OUR TEMPLATE RESOURCE LIBRARY Our HR templates are designed to make managing your staff simple and stress-free. You can download our most popular templates for free to customize for your own use. With these customizable tools at your fingertips, you can...