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Performance Matters: Managing It In Your Business

Performance Matters: Managing It In Your Business

Most leaders would be quick to say that having high performing teams are near the top of their wish list for things they want to have in their business, but in my experience most also dread getting their head around performance management as a strategic way to achieving this, for fear of being overwhelmed, not getting it ‘right’ and/or not finding the time. 

And I absolutely understand all of those things. But the truth is that the longer you put off addressing performance any more than holding the occasional 1-2-1 meeting, the more overwhelming it will seem. There is no ‘perfect’ system, no ‘wrong’ way to do it and you will be able to find the time once you realise how beneficial it can be for you personally, as well as for achieving your overall goals.

Have no fear though. See below and work your way through this checklist to start the process of taking your performance practices to the next level. 

  • Create a business process that actually, well, supports the business….. Performance management appears to have found it’s home with HR over the years, but the reality is that any performance process is a business one which should support the overall goals of the team and be culturally right. So if you’re not a formal kind of place, don’t overegg the forms and language. If you’re an agile kind of business, make sure your conversations are little and often too. If you haven’t recently reviewed your own process to see if it’s supporting your team, then take this as a reminder to do so. 
  • Design a framework to manage conversations There needs to be a degree of flexibility in your conversations, and each and every member of staff will be different. Still though, having a framework that allows you to structure the meetings and cover key points is essential. For the record those mostly include setting expectations (via goals/ objectives/ OKRS etc), developing to meet those, reviewing performance and rewarding said performance. Exactly what you decide to include at each stage will depend on the nature of your business however as a hint – for most people, annual objectives are a tad too long to be relevant. Ditto for checking in.  
  • Try focussing on strengths: As with writing any contract, policy or process, assume that you are creating it for the 99% of employees who are competent and want to do a great job and spend time focussing on what people have done well, rather than ‘fixing’ what you think needs correcting in an employee’s behaviour or performance. Evidence from the CIPD (Strengths-based performance conversations 2017) found that focussing on an individual’s strengths during these conversations improved personal conversations between the manager and employees as well as the frequency.
  • Be future focussed: Likewise to the point above, don’t spend the valuable time you have dwelling on the past. If you’ve been having reasonably regular 1-2-1’s, you shouldn’t need to re-hash events which have gone before – a summary should be enough. The rest of the time should be focused on what the individual has learned from the past and how that’s going to help them in the future in terms of their career objectives. 
  • Upskill your managers who are taking part: As your business grows, it’s unlikely that you will be able to manage all the performance discussions. The responsibility will be passed over to your other managers, and this of course makes sense if they are the ones who staff report to on a daily basis.  What you need to think about here is how you’re ensuring that these managers have the appropriate skills and training. Are they confident with the task? Do they understand its importance? And are they operating within the policies and frameworks that you have created? One-off interventions can be useful but for more sustained change and impact on 
  • Involve others: Some people think that a performance discussion simply involves the member of staff being ‘talked at’, for half an hour. This should never be the case and research shows that an individual is more likely to feel invested in the outcomes and actions of any performance conversations or ratings (if you go down that road) if they have also given the chance to have their say. Always ask individuals to share their thoughts on how they’ve performed over the past quarter, and what they think they need to focus on in the near future.  You might unearth important information that you hadn’t previously thought about, and making it a two-way conversation shows your staff that you respect and value their contribution. 
  • Ask the individual to share their views and opinions: Some people think that a performance discussion simply involves the member of staff being ‘talked at’, for half an hour. This should never be the case. Always ask individuals to share their thoughts on how they’ve performed over the past quarter, and what they think they need to focus on in the near future.  You might unearth important information that you hadn’t previously thought about, and making it a two-way conversation shows your staff that you respect and value their contribution. 
  • Welcome feedback on your own performance : You no doubt spend a decent amount of time thinking about how you can get the most out of your team. But have you stopped to think about how you’re performing as a boss? If you’re not already doing so, think about how you might be able to collect meaningful and honest feedback from your members of staff. Being a good leader is an ongoing process, and you need to have continuous development on your list of priorities, always. 

Need a little help getting started? 

If you’ve recognised that your performance management processes have some room for improvement, then get in touch. We can help you to assess where you are right now, and where you need to make changes. Get in contact via hello@thehrhub.co.uk or call 0203 627 7048 for your no-obligation chat. 


Photo by NEW DATA SERVICES on Unsplash

HR Housekeeping: Clearing Your Way To Success For The Rest of 2019

HR Housekeeping: Clearing Your Way To Success For The Rest of 2019

Pull out your coats and put the flip flops back in the loft. Although we have a few more days until it’s officially ‘Autumn’, the gentle chill is already here. For me, like many, September is my preferred ‘January’: the time where I sort out what’s going on across all areas of my life, reset my goals and generally set myself up as best I can for full steam ahead to the end of the year. 

And because I find that a  little organisation can go a long way to helping me hit my goals, I get my metaphorical rubber gloves on and do a bit of an audit on everything in my business which has been slightly bugging me, before lining up everything I need to focus on hitting my goals in each part of it. The unsightly paperwork that was lurking for so long on my desk that I filed it in a ‘boring but important’ folder where I couldn’t see it? Or the nagging question I never got around to asking my accountant yet? Yep, they’re both on my to-do list for this month. 

Same with your People. You might feel like you have your work cut out for you, but we want to lighten that load though, and give you the tools and prompts that you need to get focused, and do the work that really matters. Below therefore is a quick checklist to help keep you on course for success for the rest of the year: 

  1. Ensure that everyone has goals to be working towards toward the end of the year : There’s often a bit of a slump in productivity at this time of year. After the excitement and de-stressing for many of Summer, the mood can suddenly dampen, and you can find yourself with a problem when it comes to ensuring that the work gets done with gusto and enthusiasm. You can prevent this by getting your team together and spending time with them individually, reassessing priorities, and agreeing goals to inject motivation. Communication is key here, so be sure to lead with positivity and enthusiasm and remember to explain ‘why’ these are important….
  2. Consider how to increase your business capability: If you’ve assessed your organisational goals, you’ll be clear on what capabilities your team need in order to deliver what is going to drive you forward as a business and give you the edge you need. Many of your team will also be coming to work having thought about what else they’d like to do in terms of skills/ roles/ development. Recognise this, and use it to your advantage. Talk to them about what you will need longer term and consider how you can encourage staff to step up and develop their skills and talents outside of just their existing role. Formal training is an option, but it’s not the only route that you can take. Consider coaching, mentoring, and untapped opportunities for development that already exist in your business. 
  3. Double check your basics: No Autumn Clean would be complete without looking at some of your basics and whilst I would be the first person to say that a document is unlikely to be the thing which spearheads high performance in every corner, your HR policies and procedures should never just be documents that gather dust on your hard drive and are never again looked after once they’ve been created. By regularly reviewing their effectiveness, and assessing whether they are fit for purpose, you should take a look at them with a critical eye and ask yourself: Do they help you run the business? Do they answer questions which others still come to you for? Are they really being applied on a daily basis? Are there any gaps that you need to fill? Do your staff even know they exist? 
  4. Plan your development as a leader: Don’t forget yourself in all of this…. It’s likely that you have already considered how you will increase your staff’s capability this year. But what about YOU? As the leader of your business, it’s essential that you’re continuously developing your own skills. Running a business is challenging, and it absolutely must be a process of learning and growing. If you know that you struggle with a certain area, then it could be time to overcome that, or bring in help to make sure that your business doesn’t suffer as a result. I’ve recently signed up to an online business coaching course (after months of telling myself I simply didn’t have time to do anything like this…) to give me support with a few key things and whilst it’s early days, I ultimately recognise that I investing in myself (as I wouldn’t hesitate to do with others), will provide significant benefits. 
  5. Reach out and get the help you need: As your business grows, you quickly discover that you can’t do everything on your own. There aren’t enough hours in the day, and you can’t be expected to be good at everything! To achieve your big goals, you’ll need to consider how you are growing your team of expert advisors. 

If you know that your HR practices and procedures need work, then we can help. No-one is an expert on everything and if you’re looking for an affordable way to outsource some of your People practices, then get in touch today at hello@thehrhub.co.uk or 0203 627 7048 to arrange a chat. No strings attached. Just a frank discussion about how we can help you. 
 

Image: Unsplash: Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash